PJM

Eating for Energy

Food is fuel for our body and mind, powering us through our days. If you’re feeling sluggish and tired on a regular basis, you may want to pay particular attention to what, when and how you eat.

Food is fuel for our body and mind, powering us through our days. If you’re feeling sluggish and tired on a regular basis, you may want to pay particular attention to what, when and how you eat.

Eating nutritious food isn’t just a matter of maintaining weight; it can significantly impact how much energy you bring to daily life.

ENERGY BOOSTERS:
WATER–Dehydration is one of the most common causes of fatigue. Drink more water.

BREAKFAST–A combination of some protein and complex carbohydrates will keep you focused through the A.M.

COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATES AND GOOD FATS–Not all carbohydrates and fats are bad. Complex carbs—beans, whole grains, root vegetables—that take longer to digest (fueling you longer) and good fats like those contained in nuts, avocados and olive oil keep you going.

EATING MORE OFTEN AND JUST ENOUGH–Remember it takes time for your body to register what it’s taken in. Ending a meal before you’re full, eating smaller meals more often and munching on healthy snacks will keep you fueled but not feeling full and ready for a nap.

TREATS–Dark chocolate, fruits and vegetables and limited amounts of coffee and tea can all give you a little boost without plummeting your blood sugar levels.

Give a Hand to Save Others from Sudden Cardiac Arrest
Hands-OnlyTM CPR—Facts
Sudden cardiac arrest claims hundreds of thousands of lives each year. One of the main reasons is because no one at the scene does anything to help. In fact, less than one-third of sudden cardiac arrest victims receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Getting help right away—within a few minutes—is the key to survival.

Fortunately, the American Heart Association has a new way for anyone to step in and help adults who suddenly collapse—Hands-OnlyTM CPR. Hands-Only CPR is CPR without mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths. It involves two easy steps: Call 911 and push hard and fast on the center of the chest. Don’t stop until help or an AED arrives.

Anyone can perform Hands-Only CPR and everyone should perform it if they aren’t confident in their CPR skills or haven’t learned conven- tional CPR. Hands-Only CPR is easy to remember and results in delivery of more, uninterrupted chest compressions until more advanced care arrives on the scene.

Bystanders must take action when they see someone suddenly collapse and stop breathing normally. When effective bystander CPR is given immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, it can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Hands-Only CPR can help save lives. Find out more, and watch an instructional video at HandsOnlyCPR.heart.org.

Do not give Hands-Only CPR to infants and children—all infants and children who have a sudden cardiac arrest need conventional CPR. Adults who nearly-drown or have cardiac arrest due to a respiratory cause need conventional CPR.

About Pastors' Journal Magazine (75 Articles)
The Christian Leadership Magazine

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